Right approach

How to do it, advice sought and offered.
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davecarlisle178
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2022 11:25 am

Right approach

Post by davecarlisle178 »

Hi all

Just joined up as interested in the Caledonian Railway. My plan is to just do an anywhere layout to hone my modelling skills and then start specialising down the line, specially as my soldering skills are zero and note the locomotives and coaches seem to require lots of soldering. I do have a CR signal box already, the one from pop up with the steps on the left.

Do people think this is correct approach to take?
caleyJim
Posts: 269
Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 4:10 pm

Re: Right approach

Post by caleyJim »

Sounds good to me. At the risk of blowing my own trumpet you might like to download the Caley Coaches General Instructions from https://caley.com/assets/pdfs/genInsts.pdf. This will give you some pointers as to tools and techniques. As the director of Caley Coaches I have to declare an interest and point out that other books and articles on the subject are available. :D

Jim Smellie
caleyJim
Posts: 269
Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 4:10 pm

Re: Right approach

Post by caleyJim »

Welcome BTW
davecarlisle178
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2022 11:25 am

Re: Right approach

Post by davecarlisle178 »

caleyJim wrote: Tue Aug 23, 2022 7:40 pmWelcome BTW
Thanks for link, i have discovered one RTR loco, so there is a start.

Can i ask a quick question. The guide suggest a 25w soldering iron, is that to keep the heat down?

Forgot to ask, i have the Port Road book, does that come under the caledonian railway, just thought it was the G&SWR.

Thanks
jimwatt2mm
Posts: 889
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 5:36 pm

Re: Right approach

Post by jimwatt2mm »

davecarlisle178 wrote: Tue Aug 23, 2022 9:18 pm
Can i ask a quick question. The guide suggest a 25w soldering iron, is that to keep the heat down?

Forgot to ask, i have the Port Road book, does that come under the caledonian railway, just thought it was the G&SWR.

Thanks
Basically the bigger the iron the better so that you can get heat into the joint efficiently. What you are doing is creating an alloy between the solder and the metals you are joining To do this successfully you need clean metal, flux and sufficient heat. Running an iron at a high temperature with a decent sized bit insures that you get adequate heat into the joint in the shortest possible time. Some people make the mistake of just ‘stabbing’ in and out with the iron, which is never going to work. You have to wait until you see the solder flow into the joint and then hold it together long enough for the solder to solidify after you withdraw the iron.

I use an 80w temperature controlled iron with a 2mm chisel bit, running it at 300°. That's to build 2mm finescale models.

The Port Road was CR/GSWR joint.

Jim W
Jim Summers
Posts: 1186
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:54 pm

Re: Right approach

Post by Jim Summers »

And welcome from the Chairman too, Dave.

The other replies include good suggestions as to how to acquire confidence, and I would just add that it is like any other hobby - dive in and try.

And ask other folk when things don't go right. We would all admit that we are still learning, but things will work, and then you tell yourself the next model will be better. And it will.

Plenty of help on this group, so do ask, and we will all learn something.

Enjoy your membership of the Association and a greater acquaintance with the Caledonian Railway.

Jim S
caleyJim
Posts: 269
Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 4:10 pm

Re: Right approach

Post by caleyJim »

davecarlisle178 wrote: Tue Aug 23, 2022 9:18 pm The guide suggest a 25w soldering iron
I know some people prefer a larger iron but I've used ones in the 25w bracket for years. Even my latest which is a temperature controlled job only has a rated power of 26W albeit 200w max (it claims). TC irons cost more but are useful if you are working with whitemetal as well as brass as whitemetal needs the wick turned down to prevent you meting it. They also allow the use of different melting point solders - use a higher melting point one for the main assembly work and then a lower mp one for attaching fine detail without the basic structure falling apart. Jim W is correct tho' - use a chisel bit which you can place on the work rather than a fine-point bit which common in delicate electronic work. Don't stab and use lots of liquid flux e.g. Barrie Stevenson's formulation as produced by Slater's Plastikard (and available from Squires at ModelRail as its no longer allowable to send flux (which is an acid) by standard post.)
davecarlisle178
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2022 11:25 am

Re: Right approach

Post by davecarlisle178 »

Can i ask another quick question, although might not be an easy answer.

Have looked at various track plans, what would you suggest is a fairly simple track plan on the Caledonian Railway. I am space limited so thing simple is best.

I have discovered a station called Mutshill which appeals. Got a trackplan from signalbox, although the signalling is confusing i'm sure someone can help. Mutshill also has an ruined old church which could be interesting to model. If anyone knows anything about the station, would be most grateful to hear from you.

But also open to other suggestions.

Any advice much appreciated.
jimwatt2mm
Posts: 889
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 5:36 pm

Re: Right approach

Post by jimwatt2mm »

Depends on whether you're looking for a terminal or through station.

Of the former, Moffat was fairly simple.
moffat.png
moffat.png (438.94 KiB) Viewed 1544 times
Unfortunately it's at the edge of the map sheet, but the two sidings meet the loop, which than connects back to the main line.

Main line through stations don't come much simpler than Carnwath.
Carnwath.png
Carnwath.png (332.86 KiB) Viewed 1544 times
HTH,

Jim W
davecarlisle178
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Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2022 11:25 am

Re: Right approach

Post by davecarlisle178 »

jimwatt2mm wrote: Wed Aug 24, 2022 2:45 pm Depends on whether you're looking for a terminal or through station.

Of the former, Moffat was fairly simple.

moffat.png

Unfortunately it's at the edge of the map sheet, but the two sidings meet the loop, which than connects back to the main line.

Main line through stations don't come much simpler than Carnwath.

Carnwath.png

HTH,

Jim W
Apologies, should have mentioned, would need a through station. Carnwath station looks interesting.
MIKEWILLIAMS
Posts: 585
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 5:12 pm

Re: Right approach

Post by MIKEWILLIAMS »

Hello Dave - and welcome from me too. Please don't hesitate to ask as many questions as you like.

Re Muthill, there's useful information in Member John Young's book The Branchlines of Strathearn and eight photographs (mostly taken after closure) on the SLS website.

Best

Mike
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